How to Avoid a Meltdown… According to My Therapist

As I mentioned in an earlier blog post, I have been having near daily meltdowns since I returned to work about two months ago. At first, we thought maybe it was just due to the increased stress from the pandemic and from being sick with COVID-19 in March.

That didn’t really sit right with me, though. I knew that wasn’t the whole picture. I have been dealing with health concerns for the last 12 years with my autoimmune conditions. My meltdowns used to happen on occasion. Maybe once or twice a month, and sometimes with specific triggers (like an important social engagement I had to get dressed up for). I’ve done insane things in the middle of meltdowns before. At their extremes, I’ve thrown a heavy chair down two flights of stairs and ripped a door off it’s frame. But these incidents were pretty spread out. Daily meltdowns is completely new territory for me.

About halfway through the discussion with my therapist, the real reason for the meltdowns occurred to me. It was just stress. It was grief. I lost my cat suddenly a few months ago. Four months ago, to be exact. Four months and I still cry almost every day. He was my baby since the very day he was born and has been by my side my entire adult life. I still don’t know what my life looks like without him.

I never realized how much comfort he actually gave me until now. Losing him has thrown me into a state of chaos. I seem to have lost the ability to regulate myself and recover from being over-stimulated. All I used to need was some quiet alone-time. Now, I find myself unraveling with no way to stop it. Sometimes I will be unraveling without even being aware. My conscious brain will think I feel okay, and that I actually had a good day at work. Then I get home and completely go to pieces because I trip over a stray flip flop, accidentally bump my elbow on the door knob, or the blinds are making a horrible flapping sound with the fan on. In fact, I’m on the brink right now because my upstairs neighbors are watching movie so loud it can be heard from two buildings away (they do this on the regular—honestly never had neighbors more oblivious or disrespectful. Random passersby will even comment on how loud it is when they are out for a walk around the block).

According to my therapist, I need to find ways to help regulate myself throughout the day. One of the things she has asked me to do is a sensory scan. What am I hearing? What am I seeing? What am I smelling? What am I tasting? What am I feeling? I am supposed to go through each sense and just notice what I am experiencing. This will help get me in the present moment and will help ground me.

Another little exercise she has asked me to try is deep breathing. Since I’ve been trying to pay attention to my breathing I’ve actually noticed I tend to hold my breath a LOT. When I start getting tense at work, I just stop breathing. I’ve started combing those two exercises together, so whenever I notice myself not breathing, I make sure to breathe and then I do the sensory scan.

I’m supposed to give it a few weeks with these new techniques to see if things improve, but I’ve already noticed a difference. The only other thing I’ve changed is what I do after work. I’ve been taking more baths and experimenting with different bath bombs (not easy when you can smell things from a mile away). I’ve managed to actually find a few bath bombs with a suuuper light fragrance that doesn’t make me sick. With my highly sensitive nose, I can’t get within a mile of a store like Lush or Bath & Body a Works, so I’ve taken a few leaps of faith online and amazingly it’s worked out for me.

And on that note, I am going to go take a bath before bed with a different kind of bath bombs. I’m out of all my usuals. Cross your fingers for me—I need something relaxing right now and I’m not sure if “cotton candy” is something I can tolerate on my skin for 24 hours.